Mennonite Meets Mr. Right: A Memoir of Faith, Hope, and Love


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RIGHT is witty and moving, perfect for anyone who has taken an unexpected detour only to find that new roads lead to rich destinations. She holds a Ph. Flowing text, Original pages. Web, Tablet, Phone, eReader. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.


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Mennonite in a Little Black Dress: A Memoir of Going Home. A hilarious and moving memoir—in the spirit of Anne Lamott and Nora Ephron—about a woman who returns home to her close-knit Mennonite family after a personal crisis Not long after Rhoda Janzen turned forty, her world turned upside down. As First Lady of the United States of America—the first African American to serve in that role—she helped create the most welcoming and inclusive White House in history, while also establishing herself as a powerful advocate for women and girls in the U. Along the way, she showed us a few dance moves, crushed Carpool Karaoke, and raised two down-to-earth daughters under an unforgiving media glare.

With unerring honesty and lively wit, she describes her triumphs and her disappointments, both public and private, telling her full story as she has lived it—in her own words and on her own terms. Warm, wise, and revelatory, Becoming is the deeply personal reckoning of a woman of soul and substance who has steadily defied expectations—and whose story inspires us to do the same.

How much of ourselves should we give to those we love? Maybe she just didn't feel ready to write about it? Mar 29, Amy rated it liked it Shelves: Unexpectedly funny and relevant, though a little too random at times. A lot of these stories didn't fit within the broader chapter, or she takes pages to introduce her main topic when a quick intro paragraph would have put everything in context. Points for exceeding my expectations, though!

Jun 13, Angela Risner rated it it was amazing. For those of you who don't know, Rhoda is a professor of English and creative writing at a college in Michigan. She grew up in the Mennonite community but had moved away from that religion. After her divorce her husband turned out to be gay and a horrible accident, she returns home to her parents to recover. I was thrilled to learn that she was putting out a new book, and it did not disappoint. Rhoda takes us on her journey through exploring a new church Pentecostal , a new romance, and breast cancer.

Obviously, going from a Mennonite church to a Pentecostal church is a bit of a change, which Rhoda handles with humor and grace. She does the same with her new relationship with the man who eventually becomes her second husband. And she uses that same humor and grace when she is diagnosed with breast cancer.

The breast cancer is very advanced and there are times when it seems as though she won't make it to her wedding. Through it all, she leans on her faith, no matter if it's from a place of Mennonite solemnity or Pentecostal celebration. Miracles occur and love abounds. This book reminds me of Eat, Pray, Love in that it will speak to you depending on where you are in your life. This book happened to hit me in a particular way and I very much related to it. Here are some of my favorite quotes: We didn't have the history, the strength, the elasticity, to deal with something this big. We wanted to love each other and eat yummy little pretzels with honey mustard.

Wurby showed the class that when sand is poured into a full glass of water, in goes the sand and out comes the water. This means that gratitude and grudges wont fit into the same glass. If you add gratitude, out comes the grudge. We are all required to die as a condition of life. But nobody is required to live in an awful house. Living in an awful house is something we ought to be able to avoid. In fact every major world religion observes that suffering is inevitable and constitutive.

We suffer as part of the human condition. Now at forty-eight I think it is much more important to be loving than right. We have only two choices when an important thing disappears from our lives: Either we look at what we don't have or we look at what we do have. The choice is ours. I was asking it to do the work of intimacy for me.

Mennonite Meets Mr. Right By Rhoda Janzen – Auritt Communications

It wasn't until I tried abstinence that I arrived at a useful conclusion. Sex should enhance intimacy, not replace it. This is because sex is a pretty pale substitute for intimacy, even when you're crazy hot for your lover. I'd like to think that they were written in Cozumel, when the author was enjoying a powerful margarita. Jan 28, Martha rated it really liked it Shelves: This book will find a different audience than her hugely popular earlier Mennonite in a Little Black Dress.

This memoir is much more of a faith journey, yet still has her great sense of humor and a good pacing to it. I think many church book groups would find her account of being at peace with embracing many of the elements of a pentecostal church while still respecting many of the traditions of her earlier Mennonite upbringing and even holding on to a belief in non-literal interpretation of th This book will find a different audience than her hugely popular earlier Mennonite in a Little Black Dress.

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The audio is read well by the author. Oct 01, Ruth rated it really liked it. Made me chuckle SO many times. I really needed that. I did really want to understand the new relationship Jansen plunges into in this memoir, but I confess Mr. Right was culturally so far afield from the narrator that the attraction didn't make sense to me.

Same with her immersion in a Pentecostal church, which clearly happens only because Mr. Right is firmly planted there. But of course we cheer for her fight against breast cancer a thread that gets dropped, unfortunately--I wanted to Made me chuckle SO many times. Jun 06, Nancee rated it liked it. Read for my book club, and not my cup of tea.

Writing is good, but subject content dragged on. Jan 31, Connie rated it really liked it. This is the funniest book I have ever read or ever expect to read about having cancer and joining a Pentecostal congregation though the two are only peripherally related. It's hard to describe just what reading this book is like. Imagine hanging out with a good buddy and talking about the stuff that really matters while you laugh a lot, too. Thoughtful and witty, chatty in tone, Janzen writes with both great seriousness and a light touch when it comes to some very tough topics.

She is honest This is the funniest book I have ever read or ever expect to read about having cancer and joining a Pentecostal congregation though the two are only peripherally related. She is honest about the challenges of her cancer even as she illustrates a determination to enjoy and appreciate "what remains," with little or no note of self-pity.

I also appreciated the way she approached attending the Pentecostal congregation her husband attended. While she finds she isn't comfortable with all the theology she encounters there, she nonetheless comes to love the people who love her right back and to commit herself to faithful practice as part of the congregation. She models a "more excellent way," not of confrontation and resistance, but of gratitude and openness.

Apr 14, Jane rated it it was ok. I have fond memories of Rhoda Janzen's first memoir, but I was startled to find God steadily infiltrating every corner of this newest memoir. Janzen has a lot of hysterically funny lines in this, but after a while, I started feeling like I was reading a book about religion and not a book about one person's specific experience with religion.

I have mixed feelings about this book. The mix between personal and all-mighty religion just seemed confusing, and when I read the acknowledgements at the end I have fond memories of Rhoda Janzen's first memoir, but I was startled to find God steadily infiltrating every corner of this newest memoir. The mix between personal and all-mighty religion just seemed confusing, and when I read the acknowledgements at the end because I read everything , I found out that Janzen's husband and stepson have different names in real life.

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Which would be fine except she puts their real names in the acknowledgments! So what's the point of using fake names in the memoir? I felt ripped off, as though I had read a book of fiction. I greatly enjoyed the first half of this book. The second half was not for me. Sep 15, Claudia rated it did not like it. I received this book free with no obligation to write a review. I have wanted to write something in appreciation, but have procrastinated because the book was not a good fit for me. If I were to look only at the wordsmithing, I'd have to give the book a topnotch rating.

However, the content rating would be much lower. There were times when I thought the book was going to have a redeeming quality, only for it to take a nose dive shortly after. To be honest, I did something I rarely do, I abandone I received this book free with no obligation to write a review. To be honest, I did something I rarely do, I abandoned the book about one third of the way through.

I'm sure for a different reader, this book would be a great fit, just not for me. Sep 27, Brina rated it really liked it Shelves: I recently read Janzen's first memoir and find out she had written a second. This subject matter continues the same light writing style, making usually difficult topics into a page turner. My kids call me the grammar and spelling police so I admit one of my favorite parts of the book is Janzen's role as an English professor, especially where she diagrams sentences.

The Mennonites sound like a quaint, throw back, close-knit community. Even though Janzen left the community, she maintains friendshi I recently read Janzen's first memoir and find out she had written a second. Even though Janzen left the community, she maintains friendships to this day. I am happy she found peace in a new community, and I look forward to further writing by the author.

Jan 22, Elizabeth Mallory rated it really liked it Shelves: A comedic memoir about romance, breast cancer, and spirituality that will have you laughing and thinking deeply at the same time. The title was off-putting at first; I hate the term "Mr. Right" and I'm not interested in Christian memoirs. However, every single word in the title is sarcastic, NOT face-value.

The book itself is not a Christian memoir either, exactly, but more of a comedic one. I laughed my way through but came through with a better take on life at the end. No ground is sacred; no t A comedic memoir about romance, breast cancer, and spirituality that will have you laughing and thinking deeply at the same time. No ground is sacred; no topic goes unturned. Aug 26, Lauren rated it it was ok.

Very well written in individual descriptions but not as a full book. The first quarter of the book was well done. I was interested in the author's life and the progression of the story. Then it seemed to turn into a preach-fest. I was happy read the author's personal religious journey, but portions got way too pushy.

Feb 09, Monique rated it really liked it. God's Timing is Perfect! I have had this on my list to read for a year now. I'm not sure why I thought to pick it up now, but I'm so glad I did. Her humor and insight helped me on my own journey of faith as well as to see into the lives of those I love. She jumps around a little, but I didn't mind. A wonderful way to hear aout the Lord and his promises without having him crammed down your throat.

Jun 07, Bean rated it it was ok Shelves: Sadly, I did not like this. Loved her previous book but this one felt random and thrown together. Maybe too much pressure to deliver a new book?! Dec 17, Valerie rated it really liked it Shelves: I haven't read the author's previous book, but after finishing this one, I'm going to have to pick it up. This is the story of a faith journey; a journey that is easy to relate to for anyone who has grown up in a faith tradition and wandered away for a while.

This book challenged me in a way that few books on Christianity have, but did so in a way that didn't feel holier-than-thou. Oct 19, Meredith rated it did not like it. Really really wanted to like this book because I read Mennonite in a lbd but I just couldn't. Seemed to be way more preachy without any tight story line to follow. Oct 08, Charlene rated it did not like it. I read her first book and my daughter got an advanced copy of this and gave it to me. She becomes Pentecostal practically without blinking an eye.

Or at least, that's how these things read -- I expect that there was a lot more struggle in reality, but it doesn't come through. All the heartache of the first book is gone or am I mis-remembering? It seems to be an edited voice, cultivated to appear funnier and breezier and more miraculous, less thoughtful.

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Solve your money problems! It's all so easy! I finished the book not quite sure of what I had just read It was enjoyable, but it didn't quite feel honest. View all 4 comments. May 17, Sharon rated it did not like it Shelves: I did not care for this book. As a poet, Janzen's use of language is very skilful, but her ability to tell a story is sketchy--she does a lot of digressing into anecdotes that were not relevant to the story or particularly amusing.

Her way of explaining her faith is very strange--she starts the book out converted, while she ended her previous memoir as an agnostic. So there's no conversion story here. In sum, I really disliked the narrator, found the narrative to be poorly structured and the humor unfunny, and felt that the spiritual parts of the story were very much couched in the rhetorical language of the church and so not particularly informative for me.

Mennonite Meets Mr. Right : A Memoir of Faith, Hope, and Love by Rhoda Janzen (2013, Paperback)

Did not enjoy or learn much from this book. Mar 03, Jen rated it liked it Shelves: Quick read, with a snarky tone. I enjoyed it, except for very close to the end. The husband basically curb-stomped a chipmunk the cat had brought into the house. And Quick read, with a snarky tone. And you call yourself a Christian?!? Where does it say in the Bible that if a small rodent is introduced into your home, rather than humanely get it out, you just say, "Eff it! Those things are a pain to get out once they get in! What about being responsible stewards of God's creation?!? So yeah, that right there just dropped two stars off of this book.

It perpetuates the antiquated thought that women need to worry about "looking fat" and it also implies that God actually cares about what we look like at church. I'm sure as long as we are dressing with respect and are truly there for Him, God doesn't care if we look "fat". Granted, the author wasn't cool with it, but she didn't see it, he just told her about it and she's still with him, without any care or concern about his violent tendencies.

I guess she is a stronger woman than me, but that would just worry the heck out of me. The writing wasn't bad, her life was interesting enough, or she wrote about it in an interesting enough way, that I enjoyed the read. I did like it, but did that scene really need to be in there? At least she's being honest. And other than that, her husband did seem like a pretty decent guy and he was trying to be a good Christian, so I am sure that counts for something.

No human is perfect and I'm not saying that I am and that he should be too. All of us are works in progress. Oct 08, Miriam Downey rated it really liked it. You can find my full review here: All we need is the desire to believe. Janzen is an En You can find my full review here: Her first spiritual memoir, Mennonite in a Little Black Dress tells the story of the horrendous time in her life when she returned to her Mennonite roots to heal following a divorce and a lot of broken bones from a car accident.

The desire to believe came back to her then and continued after she returned to her academic life. By this time, she is open to returning to religion, or in her words, with the desire for faith. Although they are as opposite as can be his son says that they might be from different planets , they find they are perfect for each other. Fearing the worst, she offers to let Mitch off the hook, but he tells her that he is the right man for this challenge, and so they face the surgery, the radiation, and the chemo together.

The chapter that details how she finds out about the cancer raises goose bumps, both spiritually and factually. Yet, the way in which she handles the diagnosis is nothing short of amazing. In her inner being, she seems to know that everything will be all right, and so, as the book evolves, Rhoda marries Mitch, the cancer goes into a complete remission, and Rhoda becomes a part of Mitch's faith community. He had not told me he was going, so when he came home I was fixing dinner in the kitchen.

I was mixing meat loaf as I recall, and he walked in, gave me a peck on the cheek, and told me he had been to the doctor. Rhoda received her diagnosis over the telephone while she was counseling a student. She finished the session with the student and then went off to teach a two hour class. Sometimes doing common things helps soften the blow.

Most of Does This Church… is a love story and a narrative concerning the nature of faith and its reappearance in her life. It is the story of affirming the present, seizing upon the opportunities that life offers, and restoring the rightful place of faith in God in life. Although her spiritual journey is different from mine, I grew as I read about her journey and about the gracious God that guides her. Besides all that, like Mennonite in a Little Black Dress, this book is laugh-out-loud funny. When life becomes absurd, you can either bemoan the hand you have been dealt, or you can laugh at the irony of it all.

Dec 09, Petra Grayson rated it liked it. I had such high hopes for this book. When I saw that Ms. Janzen was writing another book, I put it onto my wish list as soon as it was listed on Amazon. Even for the high Kindle book price, I decided to splurge on this book. I didn't realize when I bought it that it was Ms. Janzen's journey back to religion. I started reading and from the first bit I got the impression the book was about her journey through cancer.

There were lots of tangents, I had such high hopes for this book. There were lots of tangents, but as you get further through the book the story about cancer sort-of drops out and it's only about religion. Specifically, her experience meeting and marrying a Pentecostal and her conversion too. It felt like there were so many loose ends in the book. I liked her writing style and stories but at the end of each story, she'd switch over to talk about something else and I was left wondering if there was a conclusion. I don't know that I'd say the book was actually preachy, but there was a lot of Bible talk.

It felt like lots of time was taken explaining the point of things like tithing or spiritual gifts but the language used was for someone who already agrees with the underlying narrative that God's Authority is right because it's God. I was disturbed by how easily Ms. Janzen was able to push aside issues that she says she feels very strongly about such as lack of female leadership in churches. I also felt let down about her monologue on the joys of a "Christian Marriage".

It really felt like she was saying marriages fall apart because the people in them are not Christian enough to "seek God in their marriage" - like it's just random chance if non-Christian people have a good marriage because the only truly great ones are Christian marriages. Overall, I was left feeling rather down after reading this book. Let me be clear that I'm not saying this impression is what her life is now, it's just what I was left feeling after reading this book. I'll keep an eye on this author because I do like her writing style and I enjoy her stories.

But I don't think I'll pick up this book again. Sep 29, Hannah Notess rated it it was ok. So, here's the thing about Pentecostals: They fascinate and confuse me. Because we believe basically the same stuff, but we go about it differently. For instance, it never occurs to me to rebuke stuff when I'm praying. But I love hanging out with them, because they are always looking to see and hear God in their everyday lives. And so those encounters make me think, "Well, why not?

In this book, she's gone to "I decided to tithe, and voila, there was a check in the mail.

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For me, my reaction was more like the reaction I have to my Pentecostal friends. In one paragraph she's like "within a week the 3-inch tumor was 90 percent gone, even though it hadn't responded to treatment before. And to the prayers of the many people who prayed for her? Instead, she just glides right past it to the next thing. I puzzled over that little paragraph for a long time. Maybe she just didn't feel ready to write about it? Mar 29, Amy rated it liked it Shelves: Unexpectedly funny and relevant, though a little too random at times.

A lot of these stories didn't fit within the broader chapter, or she takes pages to introduce her main topic when a quick intro paragraph would have put everything in context. Points for exceeding my expectations, though! Jun 13, Angela Risner rated it it was amazing. For those of you who don't know, Rhoda is a professor of English and creative writing at a college in Michigan. She grew up in the Mennonite community but had moved away from that religion. After her divorce her husband turned out to be gay and a horrible accident, she returns home to her parents to recover.

I was thrilled to learn that she was putting out a new book, and it did not disappoint.


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Rhoda takes us on her journey through exploring a new church Pentecostal , a new romance, and breast cancer. Obviously, going from a Mennonite church to a Pentecostal church is a bit of a change, which Rhoda handles with humor and grace.

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She does the same with her new relationship with the man who eventually becomes her second husband. And she uses that same humor and grace when she is diagnosed with breast cancer. The breast cancer is very advanced and there are times when it seems as though she won't make it to her wedding.

Through it all, she leans on her faith, no matter if it's from a place of Mennonite solemnity or Pentecostal celebration. Miracles occur and love abounds. This book reminds me of Eat, Pray, Love in that it will speak to you depending on where you are in your life. This book happened to hit me in a particular way and I very much related to it. Here are some of my favorite quotes: We didn't have the history, the strength, the elasticity, to deal with something this big.

We wanted to love each other and eat yummy little pretzels with honey mustard. Wurby showed the class that when sand is poured into a full glass of water, in goes the sand and out comes the water. This means that gratitude and grudges wont fit into the same glass. If you add gratitude, out comes the grudge. We are all required to die as a condition of life. But nobody is required to live in an awful house. Living in an awful house is something we ought to be able to avoid. In fact every major world religion observes that suffering is inevitable and constitutive. We suffer as part of the human condition.

Now at forty-eight I think it is much more important to be loving than right. We have only two choices when an important thing disappears from our lives: Either we look at what we don't have or we look at what we do have. The choice is ours.

Mennonite Meets Mr. Right: A Memoir of Faith, Hope, and Love Mennonite Meets Mr. Right: A Memoir of Faith, Hope, and Love
Mennonite Meets Mr. Right: A Memoir of Faith, Hope, and Love Mennonite Meets Mr. Right: A Memoir of Faith, Hope, and Love
Mennonite Meets Mr. Right: A Memoir of Faith, Hope, and Love Mennonite Meets Mr. Right: A Memoir of Faith, Hope, and Love
Mennonite Meets Mr. Right: A Memoir of Faith, Hope, and Love Mennonite Meets Mr. Right: A Memoir of Faith, Hope, and Love
Mennonite Meets Mr. Right: A Memoir of Faith, Hope, and Love Mennonite Meets Mr. Right: A Memoir of Faith, Hope, and Love

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